likethebeer: (Rueful)
You got 'Invictus' by William Earnest Henley!

A striving independent, you laugh fate in the face, creating your own destiny each and every day. You are your own strength, your own perseverance. Your sense of yourself is impeccably insightful and unfailingly accurate.

http://www.playbuzz.com/avibwx10/what-famous-poem-was-written-about-you?pbg=807d

I'll take it. It's a pretty kick-a** poem:
Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds and shall find me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate,
I am the captain of my soul.
likethebeer: (Codex from Avatar)
http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2014/08/25/the-psychology-of-writing-daily-routine/

Maybe that's why I'm so into routines. It would be nice to get the writing going, too, though.
likethebeer: (Ceci n'est pas une peep)
I never had this in high school or college, so this is the first time I've read it. I was telling immemor that, when I've seen bits & pieces of it televised I always thought the way that the character of Huckeberry Finn spoke was an affectation on the part of the producers. I had no idea that it was part of the writing style that Mark Twain used for the character.

And I knew the book, in part, has him going down the Mississippi River, but I didn't realize it takes him a while to get there & meet up with Jim. And get away from his horrible, horrible, dick-y father who I wanted to punch in the face.

So: that's what it means to read an American classic (and staple of high school classes) without knowing much about it (at least it wasn't as confusing as when I saw The Tempest).

Inkhornism

Apr. 23rd, 2014 08:37 am
likethebeer: (Codex from Avatar)
Grandiloquent Word of the Day: Inkhornism (INK•horn•iz•im) Noun: -Overworking something such as a piece of writing. -Pedantry -A show of knowledge. -Unimaginative or unduly emphasis of minutiae in the presentation or use of knowledge. -Undue display of learning. -Slavish attention to rules, details, etc. A literary composition of the sixteenth century that “smelled of the lamp” – meaning that it was overworked – perhaps from too much “burning of the midnight oil” by hack writers, who were sometimes called candlewasters. The inspiration for inkhornism was a small, portable case of writing instruments first made of wood and used from the 1300’s to the 1700’s. An inkling, the diminutive of ink, which was related to an older Anglo-Saxon verb imt, ”to mutter,” once was a sample of a written idea. A person who engaged in inkhornism was called an inkhornist. Used in a sentence: "If it weren't for my talent for inkhornism, my essays would never be long enough to receive full credit for the assignment."

Grandiloquent Word of the Day: Inkhornism
(INK•horn•iz•im)
Noun:
-Overworking something such as a piece of writing.
-Pedantry
-A show of knowledge.
-Unimaginative or unduly emphasis of minutiae in the presentation or use of knowledge.
-Undue display of learning.
-Slavish attention to rules, details, etc.

A literary composition of the sixteenth century that “smelled of the lamp” – meaning that it was overworked – perhaps from too much “burning of the midnight oil” by hack writers, who were sometimes called candlewasters. The inspiration for inkhornism was a small, portable case of writing instruments first made of wood and used from the 1300’s to the 1700’s. An inkling, the diminutive of ink, which was related to an older Anglo-Saxon verb imt, ”to mutter,” once was a sample of a written idea.
A person who engaged in inkhornism was called an inkhornist.

Used in a sentence:
"If it weren't for my talent for inkhornism, my essays would never be long enough to receive full credit for the assignment."
likethebeer: (Codex from Avatar)
http://www.businessinsider.com/books-that-changed-history-2013-12?op=1
Miriam Tuliao, assistant director of central collection development at the New York Public Library, helped us come up with a list of 25 books that changed the course of history.

From the Torah to Orwell's "1984," these 25 titles have had a major impact (listed here in alphabetical order).

One-Liners

Dec. 16th, 2013 07:54 am
likethebeer: (Christmas Codex)
I didn't realize that Billy Connolly came up with the line I think of when I think of what the meaning of "intellectual" is: "My definition of an intellectual is someone who can listen to the William Tell Overture without thinking of the Lone Ranger."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/9594011/30-great-one-liners.html?frame=2363267

And I like this one: Jimmy Carr (15 September 1972): "I saw that show, 50 Things To Do Before You Die. I would have thought the obvious one was 'Shout For Help.'"
likethebeer: (Codex Game On)
Artist and illustrator Julian Peters posted the first nine pages of a comic-book adaptation of T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” on his website some time ago. A recent wave of attention for the project convinced him to resume work on it soon, with the aim of making “rapid progress on it early in the new year.”

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2013/11/11/j_alfred_prufrock_comic_t_s_eliot_poem_illustrated_by_julian_peters.html
likethebeer: (Codex Game On)
Sounds like someone is putting their knowledge to good use:
http://www.fakebuddhaquotes.com/

I wonder if they'd pay me to look up/correct FLLW quotes? Oh, they already do - as long as I'm trying to do it while at work. Speaking of... what the hell am I still doing up? Going to sleep means I go to work tomorrow & I don't want to.
likethebeer: (Codex Game On)
Nice take down of a man named David Gilmour - who is "a novelist and a broadcaster; he teaches a few classes at Victoria College; and he makes extremely blinkered statements about literature" - and a nice discussion of literature professors, and what they try to do.

http://www.dispositio.net/archives/1688
likethebeer: (Codex Game On)
http://www.upworthy.com/6-ways-to-make-sure-you-dont-hate-your-life-and-actually-enjoy-it-and-stuff-5?c=slt1
It's a video of his commencement speech and is around 20 minutes long. The person who links to this said her favorite part starts at 9:40.




I've put this here because I know I will want to find it later, but his main point, "Make good art," makes me sad, because I don't make art.

Ah, but there was that thing that we said in grad school: "Those who can't make art, teach art history."

QOTD

Apr. 19th, 2013 08:25 am
likethebeer: (Codex Game On)
"Nobody else can be alive for you."
- e.e cummings
likethebeer: (Codex Game On)
C.M. Kornbluth's story, "The Marching Morons" involves a man from the 20th Century who wakes up in a future in which the average I.Q. has been lowered to the level of moron (I don't think calling someone whose I.Q. is below 70 a "moron" is allowed any longer, although it used to actually be used).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Marching_Morons (<--spoiler alert)

Here it is reprinted on-line:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/23657356/The-Marching-Morons
likethebeer: (Codex Game On)
http://minionfactory.blogspot.com/search/label/Pixar

He started after the announcement that Disney was buying Marvel Comics. His explanation is below:
This project started after the announcement of Disney buying Marvel comics and all the the fans started making Pixar / Avengers images. Well I was not terribly happy with the images that they were doing, so I tried to do better. ( Most of what I saw was recoloured images from "The Incredibles" movie screen grabs )

Mainly, this was just another way to better know Photoshop and I used the same rules as when I did those "Star Wars" posters. Just collected a lot of images using Google, cut and pasted them together, and this is what you get. I put them in a format that makes them look like those movie & comic trading cards I use to collect as a kid.

Hope you enjoy.
Posted by Phil Postma
He went from there to Star Wars, then Star Trek which is how I found out about it from a man I know, named Fred.
likethebeer: (cold)
Here's an article by Slate that includes the poem. Nice thing for winter.
likethebeer: (Ceci n'est pas une peep)
8 words that may not mean what you think they mean

I got at least a few of these wrong. I'm good on "unique", but not on "comprise". Something to remember.

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